Voice from the Valley

VFTV: November 15, 2017

Vocations Awareness Week

After Mass with the Sisters of St. Benedict at the Mount on All Saints Day, I was delighted to be asked to join the sisters for lunch. At table with Srs. Shawn Carruth, Kathy Kuchar and Eileen Mohs, our conversation turned to the reasons a young woman might come to join a religious community. I wondered if it was the attraction of joining a community of committed women that prompted them to join. Or maybe it was the desire for a deeply spiritual and fulfilling life. The sisters shared that it certainly could be one or the other or both of those reasons but the example, and maybe the “nudging” of a good sister or a good priest they knew growing up was most helpful.

Again this November, the 5th through the 11th, we celebrated National Vocations Awareness Week. This is a special time for us to hold out the beauty of consecrated life, the ministerial priesthood, and the diaconate. It is a week for special prayer that the response to God’s call to serve in one of these vocations will be accepted courageously and joyfully. It is a particular time to ask God to give us the sisters, brothers, priests and deacons we need to be God’s church here.

God chooses each of us to work with him in a particular way to spread the Gospel message and help grow God’s kingdom in our world. Each of us plays a key role in giving the good witness of our vocation in the ordinary circumstances in which we live. Not only during National Vocations Awareness Week, but throughout the whole year, by our own prayer, witness, and even “nudging”, we help all who are seeking the answer to the question: “To what vocation is God calling me?” Please continue to pray for vocations. 

World Day of the Poor

Pope Francis has called us to observe the very first World Day of the Poor on November 19. On this day, our Holy Father asks that we reflect on the love Jesus demonstrated for the poor and to look at how we are doing in imitating Jesus in love of the poor. We know people and families who lack access to the basic things they need: food, adequate housing, good education, healthcare, or work, etc. The newest census figures tell us that in the United States, an estimated 43 million people are living in poverty. Pope Francis is asking that on this World Day of the Poor, we do some serious praying and reflecting on how we help the poor. He invites us to think about the contrast “between the empty words so frequently on our lips and the concrete deeds against which we are called to measure ourselves.” 

I know that so many in this local church of the Diocese of Crookston are generous in helping the poor. Not only do you support your parishes but you reach out to the poor by generously contributing to the many collections that come each year. There are two particular opportunities this month to give to those who need our help. One such collection is the annual Catholic Campaign for Human Development (CCHD). This collection is being taken up on the World Day of the Poor. Many of the projects supported by CCHD embody the corporal works of mercy. This collection supports the work of groups that empower low-income people to participate in decisions that affect their lives, to be involved in work that helps break the cycle of poverty in their lives. 25% of monies collected in this diocese remain in this diocese to help people here.

The weekend after Thanksgiving, November 25 and 26, we will have our annual St. Mary’s Mission Appeal. I am continually touched by your concern and financial support for the beautiful children of Red Lake Mission. There is no question about it, your generosity continues to provide opportunities to these children that they would never have elsewhere. God bless you.

Happy Thanksgiving Day

I hope your celebration of Thanksgiving Day is truly joyous with family and friends, a warm hearth and a sumptuous dinner. America remembers on Thanksgiving; we remember the courageous spirit of our ancestors who dared to set out for a new land, trusting in God’s abiding care and guidance. They were people of faith and the colonies they founded were communities of faith. They remembered to give thanks to God for the bounty they received and celebrated a Thanksgiving Day meal together with one another and their newfound native friends. At your Thanksgiving Day meal, I invite you to use this prayer of blessing: “O loving Father, your gifts of love are countless and your goodness infinite. We celebrate this Thanksgiving Day with gratitude for your kindness and many blessings. We thank you for the witness and work of the pilgrims who founded this land. In this, our day, we ask for your continued blessing and guidance on America. As we enjoy the fruits of your bounty this day, strengthen our hearts to joyfully reach out to others in love so that all people may share in the good things of time and eternity. We ask through Christ our Lord. Amen.”